Tag Archives: Allah

Power in its best form

When someone says the word ‘power’, we usually automatically think of strength, authority, might, force, intensity, and other things of the sort which pertain to our definition of power. Laylatul-Qadr, ‘The Night of Decree’, also known as the night of power, is the most blessed and most powerful night in the lunar month of Ramadhan. Powerful in the sense that a little bit can go a long way, as stated by Allah (SWT) in the Holy Quran,

“The night of Al-Qadr is better than a thousand months (i.e. worshipping Allah in that night is better than worshipping Him a thousand months, i.e. 83 years and 4 months)” [97:3].

A thousand months is more than the estimated human lifespan of 79 years! So in other words, catching Laylatul-Qadr will give you the reward of more than 83 years of worship. I know a bargain when I see one, and that is one I can’t say no to. Speaking of which, when is Laylatul-Qadr you may be asking. Well, we’re taught that it is in the last ten nights of Ramadhan, and that is it an odd night in the last ten nights.

“Allah’s Messenger (SAW) used to practice Itikaaf in the last ten nights and say: ‘Seek out Lailatul-Qadr in the (odd nights) of the last ten days of Ramadhan.’” (Bukhari, Muslim)

How can you get the most of these last few nights of Ramadhan other than the usual doing adhkaars and making du’aa? Listed below are 3 easy and practical things we can do in the last 10 nights to maximise and take advantage of this great opportunity Allah has given us.

  1. Give charity every night, even if it’s just $1. When this coincides with Laylatul-Qadr, it will be as though you have given charity daily for 1000 months.
  2. Praying just 2 rakaat of qiyaam every night. When this coincides with Laylatul-Qadr it will be as though you have prayed every night for over 83 years.
  3. Read Surah Ikhlaas 3 times every night, for this surah carries the weight of one third of the Quran, despite its short length. When your recitation coincides with Laylatul-Qadr, it will be as though you completed the Quran nightly for 1000 months.

These above tips are just a few tips among the sea of things we can do in these last 10 nights. Spending time with family, feeding the homeless, reciting and reflecting on the Quran, memorising a du’aa every night, attending taraweeh with your families, and performing itikaaf are all things we can do as well. Some things may be a little out of our capacity, but nothing we do will go by unnoticed and unseen, for Allah is The All-Seeing, and His mercy extends over us in way we will never come to fathom. One of the scholars said that we even get rewarded for sleeping if our intention is to rest up to worship Him the coming day. SubhanAllah! Do not underestimate any action you do before Allah, especially in these last 10 nights!

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Our greatest weapon

Du’aa, we’re told, is the weapon of a believer. And from a young age we’re taught to make du’aa for the things we want in life, whether that’s good grades, Jannah, or those pair of shoes mum said she wasn’t going to buy us. We grew up believing that if we asked God for it long and hard enough, that eventually it’ll be given to us on a silver platter. And when things didn’t end up going according to our plan, we would sulk because we couldn’t see the wisdom behind it, or what was given to us *instead* of what we were asking for.

Something changed within us. The point of du’aa shifted. We no longer yearned for the conversation we got out of supplicating to our Lord. We no longer craved the connection we got out of knowing we had the BEST of listeners, listening to US. Hearing us. Supporting us. Carrying us through our tough times. We no longer found a friend in the Almighty, even though He loves us more than a mother loves her child, and has more mercy on us than the mercy a mother has towards her baby. We became unsure of whether He wanted what was best for us, and thought we knew better.

Du’aa became less of a supplication, and more of a demand. 

“Ask, and you will be given” [Tirmidhi], got taken out of context and we attributed our Lord, *the Creator of the heavens and the earth* into a mere genie, who would apparently grant us much more than just 3 wishes. And we taught our kids to do the same, who taught their kids to do it too. And for generations this continued, until eventually all Islam became was an inheritance. We stopped learning, we stopped yearning. We settled for what we were taught and stopped asking questions. We stopped reaching for the stars, we stopped reaching out to other people. We stopped thirsting for knowledge. We settled. We settled for this life and all the nonsense it bought with it. We settled for impatience and greed. We settled for just the compulsory acts of worship. We lost touch with ourselves. We lost touch with our Lord.

I think it’s time we retrace our steps, and find that connection again. Du’aa is your greatest weapon, and always will be because there’s nothing like having God on your side. Find the meaning of supplication within your own soul. Converse with your Lord, find a friend in Him. Know that the point of du’aa was always the conversation and connection. Seek it, find it, and your outcome will be served to you on a silver platter. It may not be the outcome you prayed for, but it’s the outcome that’s best for you, and you need to trust that Allah know’s what He’s doing. He’s your greatest friend after all 🙂

“And when my servants ask you concerning me, [tell them] I am indeed near. I respond to the invocation of the supplicant when he calls.” [2:186]

The spices of life

“Every soul shall taste death”, is one of the many things Allah has promised the humans living on this earth, regardless of race or religion. Nobody can escape the grips of death when their time comes, no matter how old or young, how rich or poor.

Something I would like to bring your attention to is that Allah uses the word ‘taste’, or ‘savour’ as opposed to something like ‘experience’. You see, us humans, we taste the different flavours of life via the many experiences we undergo. We taste the sweetness of having family and friends around us, we taste the bitterness of tragedy that descends upon our lives, we taste well deserved victory after attaining something we’ve been trying to achieve, such as a degree or a good job. Every experience brings with it a distinct taste, a flavour of its own. And death is no different.

For lovers of all things good, death will be another distinctly sweet taste they’ll experience. Could there be anything sweeter knowing where they are headed and who they’ll be keeping the company of? And for those that derive pleasure from causing mischief on the land of God, well, they will also taste death with a distinct flavour. How you live on this earth and the flavour preferences you’ve chosen determine what flavour you’ll be served at the time of your death. The choice *literally* lies in your own hands. So ask yourself: do I want my departing experience to be a good or a bad one? And then live your life accordingly.